• FOR BREXIT TO MEAN BREXIT LEAVE MUST MEAN LEAVE

    The nation voted to leave – not become semi-detached
  • LEAVE MEANS FORGING NEW TRADE DEALS TO MAKE THE WORLD OUR OYSTER

    Our educational, scientific, cultural, linguistic and diplomatic soft power can grow
  • LEAVE MEANS TAKING BACK CONTROLOF OUR LAWS, TAXES AND BORDERS

    Our own laws and taxes decided by our own democratic institutions
  • LEAVE MEANS A BRIGHTER FUTURE FOR TRADE WITH DEVELOPING NATIONS

    Outside the single market means cheaper easier trade with the world
  • LEAVE MEANS EXPANDING BRITISH INFLUENCE OF OUR CULTURE, LANGUAGE AND IDEAS

    Its reach - cultural, linguistic, military, diplomatic, scientific, political, economic - is global
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  • BREXIT GOOD NEWS
  • BRITAIN'S INFLUENCE
  • OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS
  • NO SINGLE MARKET
  • VITAL FACTS
  • OUR RED LINES

Manufacturing index has 10-month high!

The UK’s manufacturing enjoyed a strong rebound in output and new orders in August, according to the...

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Foreign investment on the up!

Foreign investment into the UK has defied all the warnings from scaremongers that Brexit would dry...

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Business activity on the up!

Business activity in England and Wales has seen a post Brexit jump after an initial loss in confidence through uncertainty caused...

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Manufacturing index has 10-month high!

The UK’s manufacturing enjoyed a strong rebound in output and new orders in August, according to the...

Read on

Foreign investment on the up!

Foreign investment into the UK has defied all the warnings from scaremongers that Brexit would dry...

Read on

Business activity on the up!

Business activity in England and Wales has seen a post Brexit jump after an initial loss in confidence through uncertainty caused...

Read on

Britain leads in Soft Power without EU help

Soft power includes international perception, global media reach, inventions, education, diplomacy, the charity sector, culture, sport and architecture and international...

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UK’s cultural influence will continue to grow

While cultural excellence transcends national boundaries and Europe in general has, for centuries, provided a deep well of creativity the UK’s cultural influence...

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UK a world leader in media and sport

While it may not be everyone’s idea of the best way to organise television, the BBC arguable has the strongest brand name in the world and in some quarters still...

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New Zealand and Australia want to help Brexit

The governments of New Zealand and Australia have offered to help the UK negotiate new trade deals with other countries by providing their own skilled trade negotiators on loan. As well as the officials being made available both countries are very keen to strike informal free trade agreements with the UK so that they are ready to be formalized on the day the UK leave the EU – B-Day!

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Twenty-seven countries want a trade deal

Trade Secretary Liam Fox has reported ten countries are lining up to make free trade agreements while others are using the media to signal their intent to strike a deal. Countries known to be interested include (in alphabetical order): Australia, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Germany, Ghana, Iceland, India, Ireland, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, South Korea, Suriname, Switzerland, the United States, Uruguay and Venezuela.

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Trade deficit reduces thanks to Brexit vote!

The Brexit-related fall in the Pound Sterling has led to and exports boost that has reduced the UK’s trade deficit by £1 billion so far.

The latest statistics from the Office for National Statistics said the gap last month was £4.5billion, falling from £5.6billion just before the referendum. The improvement for UK trade was driven by a big jump in exports, up by £800million to £43.8billion.

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Leave Means Leave believes the EU’s Single Market is not all it is cracked-up to be:

  • The Single Market’s external customs tariff has impoverished developing nations by shutting them out from free trade with the UK and most of Europe.
  • By seeking to regulate away competitive advantage between nations and businesses the Single Market is becoming progressively economically stagnant.
  • The cost of being inside the Single Market (the EU membership fees and imposition of its laws) far outweighs the financial benefits of zero tariffs.
  • You do not have to be inside the Single Market to have access to it. Average tariffs for those outside it are only 1.09%, far less of a deterrent to trade than currency fluctuations or domestic taxes.
  • Having access to the Single Market – like the USA, China and Japan have – is preferable to being inside the single market where the UK has to pay a membership fee and is subject to the rule of a foreign court (the European Court of Justice), and must accept free movement of Labour.

For more details read our Vital Facts [link].

Leave Means Leave believes the UK’s trade will benefit from being outside the Single Market:

  • Trade is critical to the UK economy with UK exports of £669bn in 2015 – but it has the largest current account deficit in the G7, approaching 6% of GDP. Globally, the UK runs a substantial surplus in services and a substantial deficit in goods. Understanding the reason for this is critical to designing the right trade strategy post BREXIT.
  • The UK’s goods trade deficit with the EU was £89bn in 2015. The UK recorded a £10bn goods surplus with the America’s (largely the US). Leave Means Leave asks why should the UK have a goods surplus with the US, where there is no preferential trade deal, and a massive goods deficit with the Single Market where there is? Further, the UK service surplus with the US is approximately 50% higher than all 27 nations of the EU combined, again without any preferential deal.
  • The UK runs a trade surplus with the rest of the world and a very large deficit with the EU. This is a paradox – the UK underperforms in the regulatory regime it is tied into, but out-performs in the rest of the world where it is not. The reverse would be the expected outcome.
  • The EU is a declining bloc. Its GDP growth has lagged every other region in the world for a generation and the rate of decline is accelerating. It is highly regulated and resistant to reform. This has caused business to vote with its feet away from the declining EU to faster growth markets. In 1999 61% of UK trade was with the EU, now is 43%. By 2025 Global Britain estimates the EU will account for under 35% trade
  • We believe structurally low EU economic growth and the nature of the Single Market, which favours trade in goods over the UK’s strategic advantage in services, has caused the UK to perform, from a trading perspective, so poorly with the EU and so much better with the rest of the world. These critical observations greatly undermine the case for remaining in the Single Market or EEA.
  • Global tariffs continue to fall. Average tariffs into the EU are now just above 1%. While they remain high in a few sectors, agricultural products being the prime example, the benefit from being within the single market from the global tariff regime is minimal.
  • Further it is a fallacy that one needs to be in the Single Market to trade with it. US, China, Japan and Australia all enjoy access so long as they meet the single market regulatory standards – just as the UK can trade with China so long as Chinese standards are met for its local market.
  • Not only does the Single Market give advantages to trade in goods over services, it also discriminates between raw materials and processing, forcing poor developing countries to export their commodities rather than develop their own manufacturing. This results in Germany – without growing a single coffee bean – making more profits from processing coffee beans than the whole of Africa does from exporting them.
  • Understanding the dynamics of the UK’s current trading position is critical in designing the right post BREXIT trade policy. It is clear from the UK’s performance from within the single market that something is badly amiss.
  • The key lesson is the UK does well with the world and very badly with the place the UK it is currently tied to and remaining in the Single Market will not improve this deficit. On the contrary, it may make matters worse as we are required to incorporate continuing EU single market related regulation into our domestic law without any say in its framing. This cannot constitute ‘leaving’ the EU.
  • If the UK remains tied to the EU single market regulatory regime it will continue to pull our political and economic focus towards the world’s least successful economic zone while tying us down with needless and expensive regulation.
  • Remaining in the Single Market, while being outside the EU, may well be worse than the current arrangements, unsatisfactory as they are. The UK would swap a current marginal influence on Single Market regulation (12% vote in the council of ministers) for no say in regulatory framework at all. The remain in the Single Market option is the no vote, low growth, regulatory burden, sovereignty illusion option locking in perpetual deficits – which is why No Deal is Better than a Bad Deal

Six redlines that would ensure Leave means Leave

  1. The European Court of Justice shall have no jurisdiction in the UK.
  2. Control of migration into the UK will return to the our own parliament with EU treated the same as non-EU nations.
  3. There shall be no fee paid by the UK to the EU for access to the 'single market' in goods.
  4. The UK will leave the Common Agriculture and Common Fisheries policies (CAP & CFP) and devolve responsibility for agriculture and fisheries to the four nations of the UK.
  5. The UK contribution to the European Development Fund should end when the UK leaves the EU (not 2020).
  6. The UK shall be free to negotiate in advance bilateral trade deals for introduction on the day of Brexit.

Latest Highlights

  • LEAVE MEANS LEAVE
  • Forthcoming Events
  • Media Information
  • Our History
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David Davies, the EU Exit Minister has confirmed that the government will not be providing a running commentary on its plans in the run-up to triggering Article 50 to effect a Brexit.

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A second poll in two weeks has shown that Scots do not want a second independence referendum because of the UK vote for Brexit – and, if forced to choose, would prefer to be in the UK and outside the EU – rather than outside the UK and in the EU.

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A second poll in two weeks has shown that Scots do not want a second independence referendum because of the UK vote for Brexit – and, if forced to choose, would prefer to be in the UK and outside the EU – rather than outside the UK and in the EU. The common travel area between Ireland and the UK was established by statute in 1922 and holds to this day irrespective of EU membership. This, together with the fact that Ireland is not a signatory to the EU’s Schengen Treaty means that Ireland’s points of entry to the country are also the UK’s points, and the UK’s points of entry are also Irelands – there being no passport or border controls between them.

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Scottish fishing leaders have met with Conservative politicians in Peterhead to discuss how Brexit can be made to work. Representatives of the Scottish Fishermen’s Federation, Clyde Fishermen’s Association, the Scottish Pelagic Fishermen’s Association, the Mallaig and North-West Fishermen’s Association and the Scallop Association at Peterhead Port Authority met with Ian Duncan MEP, a Member of the European Parliament Fisheries Committee, Shadow Rural Affairs Secretary Peter Chapman MSP and Fishing spokesman Finlay Carson MSP met.

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The farming industry has had discussions with the government to ensure provision is made for agricultural workers in any plans drawn up for new migration controls.

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The response coming from the Labour Party to the peoples’ vote for Brexit continues to divide the party – while risking the alienation of large sections of their natural voters.

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Conservative Party Conference Fringe meeting
Monday 3rd October 6.00pm, Crowne Plaza Hotel, Birmingham
  • Dominic Raab MP, former Justice Minister
  • Dr Gerard Lyons, former economic advisor to Mayor of London
  • Richard Tice, Chairman of Leave Means Leave

Followed by a drinks reception

Coming soon

Half-day conferences on:

The optimal trade deal for the UK – with Dr Gerard Lyons, Ruth Lea and Ewen Stewart

How we can provide aid through trade – with Sir Desmond Swayne MP, and Brian Monteith

Making immigration work for the UK – with Alp Mehmet and Bianca Nicolescu

Look out for the dates and details being announced soon.

16-09-16
WHY THE EU'S SINGLE MARKET IS FAILING BRITAIN.PDF
10.3.16
BritainVotesToLeaveWhatNextFeb16.pdf
31.3.15
GB Brexit Position Paper.pdf
16.2.15
GB Report The Scaremongers.pdf
10.6.14
Employment Growth the UK is the European Dynamo june 14.pdf
10.6.14
UK Trade Would Boom Outside the EU June 14.pdf
14.5.14
THE UK's Unique Trading Opportunity.pdf
29.4.14

GlobalBritainchallengesSirMikeRakeApril14.pdf

24.3.14

LostIllusionsWeb.pdf

3.3.14
BritainsUSP'sPublication2014.pdf

Global Britain was founded in 1997 by Lord Pearson of Rannoch, Lord Stoddart of Swindon and Lord Harris of High Cross with the aim of making the case that Britain's prosperity is founded on a global vision, not a European customs union, and that British prosperity would be best served by withdrawing from the European Union.

From 1997 to 2013 Global Britain’s main activities were briefing peers, MPs and MEPs of all parties for their debates and select committee work in the Westminster and European parliaments. When, in February 2013, the Prime Minister announced his policy of re-negotiating after the next election the terms of EU membership and putting the outcome to the British people in a referendum, it was decided to focus Global Britain’s research and activities on two important non-parliamentary “constituencies”: the City of London in particular and British business in general. This new focus was emphasised by the appointment of Ewen Stewart as Consulting Director and David Stewart (no relation) as Treasurer, bringing with them their long and successful experience in the financial and business worlds. Having been research director since 1999, Ian Milne became the non-executive Chairman.

Lord Harris of High Cross read economics at Cambridge and lectured in political economy at the University of St Andrews from 1949 to 1956. He was appointed General Director of the Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) on its foundation by Anthony Fisher in 1956; subsequently, he became the IEA’s Chairman in 1987 and its Founder-President in 1990. He was a director of Times Newspaper Holdings Ltd between 1988 and 2001. In 1979, Margaret Thatcher made him a life peer in the first honours list of her premiership; he sat as a cross-bencher until his death in 2006. The IEA under his direction had an enormous influence on public policy and on the views of leading politicians, notably Keith Joseph, Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan.

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